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Tag archives for introductions

If you’ve read any books or articles about networking, then you’ve seen the suggestion to come up with what’s called an “elevator speech” pitch. The idea is that you should be able to completely describe what your company sells and why customers buy from you in less than a minute — during an elevator ride.
For a long time I tried to do this. I worked on creating an elevator pitch for networking events, but I found that the elevator pitch monologue just didn’t feel right. After all, it was supposed to be a conversation.

Then, I found the article Kill the Elevator Speech about abandoning the idea of having an elevator pitch. What it said made sense — convey the same information that’s in an elevator speech, but do it step-by-step in a conversation!

I’m not saying that an elevator speech isn’t helpful.

Just writing an elevator pitch is helpful to clarify what your company offers. But, it turns out that an elevator speech is useful only for events where delivering a short pitch is the format for the meeting. For example, the pitch fest meetings where entrepreneurs pitch potential investors on investing in their company in less than a minute is an interesting and entertaining format, but it seldom results in a worthwhile new connection.

Elevator speeches are also valuable at “speed networking” events where the objective is to tell your pitch quickly, or listen to the other person’s pitch, so you can make the most of the few minutes you have — before moving on to the next person’s pitch. However, in the casual, conversational setting of a networking mixer, it’s better to use a slightly different technique.

Here is a simple, one sentence format for introducing your story in a way that’s easy for the other person to remember:
[Company] provides [product or service solution] that helps [type of customer] [benefit].

Here are some examples to show how this template can be used:

  • Apple Computer provides computer-based products that helps people use digital content.
  • Honda provides cars and trucks to both consumers and businesses that are used to go places.
  • The Los Angeles Times provides news and information to people in Southern California that helps them stay in touch with their community.
  • SureToMeet provides meeting registration services that helps event organizers attract more people to events and meetings.

Most of these companies provide more than one product or service. But, people at busy networking events can only remember one thing that your company provides.

Start conversations with your one sentence introduction, and be ready to answer questions about your company as they come up in the conversation.

So, set the elevator speech aside for when an event calls for you to deliver a short pitch. Then, come up with a short way to quickly describe the one thing you want people at networking events to remember that you can provide.

After you’ve attended a number of business networking events and have collected a stack of business cards from contacts, you may ask yourself, “What do I do with these contacts?”

One of the key benefits of networking is being able to weave contacts into a network of people who can help each other.

If you keep your contacts from knowing with each other, there’s little way they can work together to help you achieve your objectives. On the other hand, if you have introduced many of your contacts to each other, it’s easy for them to work with each other in ways that benefit both them and you.

While it’s possible for the contacts you introduce to each other to exclude you from their activities, that’s very unlikely when you are a key part of their lives.
So, how do you introduce contacts to each other? Here are a few ways to introduce your contacts to each other.

  • Introduce two contacts to each other when you see both of them at a networking event.
  • Send an introductory e-mail to both people describing a bit about each person and why you think they would be interested in knowing each other.
  • Schedule a conference telephone call for all three of you so you can introduce them to each other.
  • Schedule a breakfast, lunch, or dinner where the three of you can meet.

Each person will be impressed that you’ve made a special effort to help them meet someone they’re likely to be interested in knowing.

The more you’re able to introduce people to each other, the tighter your network becomes, and the more everyone in your network will benefit from knowing each other.

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