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Tag archives for meetings events

Big events used to be a great way to pull people together, motivate them, and update them on new information. Corporations held large internal meetings. And, industry associations held large annual conventions for their members.

However, the low cost of the Internet and the high cost of convention halls, hotels, and airlines – plus the lost productivity – has resulted in a decrease in the number of those huge corporate events and week-long industry conferences.

Seth Godin questions big event value

Seth Godin sparked a conversation on the Web on whether big events are still valuable. He was referring to large events such as product introductions, but the meeting/event industry used his piece to discuss the challenges of their industry.

And, the meetings and events industry that produces large events is facing some big challenges. I can name almost a dozen large conferences I used to attend that don’t exist anymore. And, many other large events just aren’t so large these days,
For example, a few weeks ago I attended a large industry association conference in Las Vegas to help a startup company research a manufacturing technology. Not being from that industry, we needed to get up to speed quickly, meet vendors selling that technology, and evaluate the technology.

Unfortunately, the conference had no educational sessions on this small, emerging technology. So, we met with the handful of vendors – whose booths were scattered across multiple buildings. And, since attendance at the show was down the people in the booths had plenty a time to talk with us.

It turned out that it would have been much more productive and inexpensive for us to attend a day-long seminar with presentations by just these vendors.

Replacing conventions and big conferences

What’s replacing those huge conventions and conferences? Two things.

  • First, of course, is the Internet. Initially, e-mail discussion groups and forums provided information more quickly than trade magazines and annual conferences. Today, webinars and self-paced e-learning deliver information and education where and when you need it.
  • Second, local/regional meetings and events provide an easy and inexpensive way to meet with likeminded people face-to-face more frequently than at annual conferences. In addition, the quality of presentations at local groups and chapter meetings is frequently as valuable as those at large national conferences.
  • Facebook is launching internal corporate networking to replace emails. “Workplace by Facebook” will be a paid service, Facebook’s FIRST paid service, that charges a monthly fee for enterprise-grade security and administration of the system that allows corporate employees to collaborate, news feed with posts, and live video as well as share documents.

The big, expensive conferences will survive on lower attendance. They just won’t be so big and expensive.

Local events & meetings

Expect to see a lot more local groups and organizations produce high-quality meetings and events around the narrow, specific interests of their members – which will reduce the need to fly off to large conventions.




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People attend meeting and events over and over again because they feel they receive value from attending each time. Once they attend a few meetings and don’t feel that they benefited they quit attending.
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It’s no secret that we all act that way. What seems to be a secret to many groups and organizations is how to deliver the “value” that members and volunteers are seeking.

During her Lazy Leader Road Show, Cynthia D’Amour shared how to attract (and retain) members by appealing to their “hot buttons.” People who attend meetings are looking for some combination of these attributes:

  • Personal/professional development
  • Make a difference
  • Be part of a community

Every organization is different, so each organization’s members look for different combinations of these attributes.

Chapters of professional organizations rely more on professional development than a business networking mixer group. But, both types of organizations have the same challenge — to deliver the “value” that meets the needs of members in these three areas.

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